Tillage

 

Barley Disease Control Update

In barley the number of ears per m2 has a strong impact on yield and while it is possible to achieve some compensation for low ear numbers as crops with lower tiller numbers produce more grains per ear, the scope is limited in barley with this ability 30-50% less than in wheat. In other words ‘thick’ crops of barley tend to be the highest yielding ones.....Read More

 

STRIPE

Pesticide Registration and Control Division Notes
Buffer zones are areas adjacent to water (mainly) or hedgerows which cannot receive direct application of particular pesticide(s).  A minimum buffer zone of 1m applies to all Plant protection products (PPPs) i.e. PPPs must not be applied within 1m of any surface water body regardless of rate of application, type of nozzles used and whether water is present in the surface water bod.....Read More

 

Barley Disease Control Update

In barley the number of ears per m2 has a strong impact on yield and while it is possible to achieve some compensation for low ear numbers as crops with lower tiller numbers produce more grains per ear, the scope is limited in barley with this ability 30-50% less than in wheat. In other words ‘thick’ crops of barley tend to be the highest yielding ones.....Read More

 

Legislation and Greening

Rightly or wrongly paperwork has become increasingly important on farms and even more so on tillage farms. Recent additional legislation and ‘greening’ measures will add to this burden in 2015. With significant payments from Europe and penalties for non-compliance, it is critical you know the rules and ensure you comply with them.....Read More

 

Guideline Sowing Rates for Winter Cereals (October 2014)

As we are now in late October it is getting late for sowing Winter Barley and Oats and seeding rates should be increased accordingly. Sow by target plants per m2 rather than by traditional weight per hectare/acre.  To determine sowing rates you need to know: .....Read More

 

Slugs in Winter Crops

Types of Slugs: The Grey Field Slug is the most widespread and common problem in Ireland and can breed at any time of the year when conditions are favourable (mild and moist) but breeding activity peaks in spring and autumn.....Read More

 

Guideline Sowing Rates for Spring Cereals 2015

Aim to sow spring cereals by target plants per m2 rather than by traditional weight per hectare/acre. Tables 1-3 below give suggested seeding rates for spring cereals but please note this depends on thousand grain weights, sowing conditions, sowing date etc.. ....Read More

 

Growing Spring Beans in 2015

Reasons to grow Spring Beans
1. NEW Protein subsidy of €250/ha (€101/ac) is available.2. Dairygold are offering contracts to grow Spring Beans at a minimum guaranteed price of €180 per ton at 20% moisture. Based on Teagasc 2015 crops costs and returns, to deliver a €100/acre margin (excluding the protein subsidy), a 2.6 tonne/acre yield is required. This compares favourably to Spring Barley where a 3.7 tonne/acre yield is required to deliver a €100/acre margin!3. It is an excellent break crop for cereals.4. Beans satisfy two of the new ‘Greening’ requirements i.e. a different crop under the two/three crop rule and as an Ecological Focus Area (EFA). Growing Guidelines for Spring BeansRotation: Allow 4 years between Bean (or Pea) crops; and 3 years between Beans and OSR.Varieties: Fuego is tried and trusted in Ireland but there will be some Fanfare and Boxer available which trials suggest is higher yielding. Time of Sowing: Ideally Mid-January to late-February (early sown crops tend to be more successful).  Crops can be sown in early to mid-March but this runs the risk of reduced yield and later harvesting.Seed Bed Preparation: Aim for a firm, fine seed bed similar to a grass re-seed.  Avoid compaction.  Drill Beans to a minimum of 7.5cm (3 inches) deep.Fertiliser: The target pH for Spring Beans is 6.5-7.0.  Nitrogen (N) is not required as Beans fix N.  Apply Phosphorus (P) and Potassium (K) requirements to the seedbed but avoid combine drilling which can affect germination.
1. NEW Protein subsidy of €250/ha (€101/ac) is available.
2. Dairygold are offering contracts to grow Spring Beans at a minimum guaranteed price of €180 per ton at 20% moisture. Based on Teagasc 2015 crops costs and returns, to deliver a €100/acre margin (excluding the protein subsidy), a 2.6 tonne/acre yield is required. This compares favourably to Spring Barley where a 3.7 tonne/acre yield is required to deliver a €100/acre margin!

Reasons to grow Spring Beans1. NEW Protein subsidy of €250/ha (€101/ac) is available.2. Dairygold are offering contracts to grow Spring Beans at a minimum guaranteed price of €180 per ton at 20% moisture. Based on Teagasc 2015 crops costs and returns, to deliver a €100/acre margin (excluding the protein subsidy), a 2.6 tonne/acre yield is required......Read More

 

 

BYDV and Aphid Control in Cereals

By far the most significant damage aphids cause to cereal crops is the transmission of Barley Yellow Dwarf Virus (BYDV). BYDV is most damaging to plants infected in the early growth stages and large yield losses can result (as shown in Figure 1 below).  While all cereals are equally susceptible, Barley is generally the most severely affected due to sowing dates (Winter Barley sown earlier in the autumn and Spring Barley later in the spring when aphids are more active).. ....Read More

 

Chemical Weed Control in Winter Cereals

While this article focuses on chemical control, it must be remembered that best practise weed control in winter cereals also includes:
• Choice of cultivation techniques (ploughing versus non-inversion etc.)....Read More

 

Control of Brome Grasses in Cereals

Article largely based on HGCA guide on Bromes, for more information see http://www.hgca.com/media/433528/is31-identification-and-control-of-brome-grasses.pdf

Brome grasses are important weeds as they can cause up to 40% yield loss and can slow harvesting in winter cereal crops. Brome is historically associated with minimum tillage continuous Winter Wheat. However, with the increase in popularity of Winter Barley, they have become an increasing problem in some fields....Read More

 

Dairygold Harvest Intake 2014

While 2014 may not be remembered as a great year for you, the tillage farmer, owing to disappointing grain prices; you will remember fondly the bumper yields and a very straightforward harvest.

Dairygold total harvest intakes
Figure 1 shows the Dairygold total harvest intake (all cereals plus oilseed rape and beans) for the years 2009-2014.  The graph highlights the effect of the strong yields in 2014 with the total intake increasing nearly 13,000 tonnes over 2013 to 127,690 tonnes.....Read More

 

Winter Oilseed Rape 2014-15

Rotation

• Allow 4 years between OSR (or other Brassica) crops
• 3 years between beet and OSR
• 2 years between beans and OSR.

Time of Sowing
• Sow ASAP from Mid-August (early sown crops tend to be more successful) up to a latest sowing date of circa 10th September......Read More

 

Ear Diseases

Ear diseases can affect your crops by reducing grain fill, leading to low Bushel weights and high screenings. Certain types of infections e.g. Fusarium, can also result in mycotoxin production, which can cause problems for end users. Sooty Moulds and similar diseases can cause a blackening of your grain, which in extreme cases can lead to rejection.....Read More

 

Spring Cereal Weed Control

Once your crop is sown, spring cereal weed control is highly dependent on herbicides.  The key requirements for cost-effective herbicide programmes are listed below.
1. The type of weeds present-Correctly identifying the weeds present in your fields (field history can be very helpful here) and knowing the importance of these weeds are critical.....Read More

 

Soil Fertility Management

Fertiliser use and soil fertility headlines
• 55% of soils tested in Ireland in 2013 were low (index 1 or 2) in Phosphorus (P)
• 52% of soils tested in Ireland in 2013 were low (index 1 or 2) in Potassium (K)
• 80% of soils tested in Ireland in 2013 were short in lime for optimum crop growth (below pH 6.5):.....Read More

 

Guideline Sowing Rates for Winter Cereals Autumn 2013

 

Winter Cereals: Sow by target plants per m2 rather than by traditional weight per hectare/acre.  Therefore to determine sowing rates you need to know... ....Read More

 

Crop Rotations

Why has crop rotation reduced? Historically, crop rotation was a critical farming practice to maximise soil fertility and achieve satisfactory weed and disease control. As agricultural systems modernised, the need for crop rotation reduced with the availability of relatively cheap artificial fertiliser and crop protection products to control disease... ....Read More

 

Dairygold Grain Purchasing Terms and Condition

Dear Grain Supplier,

The grain sector remains a central element of today’s food industry. As with all other food related industries, the highest standards of safety and quality are fundamental requirements of our business. Our customers expect full traceability from furrow to fork and Dairygold only supplies safe, traceable and quality agricultural produce.....Read More

 

Fungicide Resistance

Fungicide resistance occurs through evolution of a fungus when a stable mutation results in a reduction in sensitivity to a fungicide by a fungal population. Evolution is a slow process in animals that takes thousands of years but because fungi reproduce rapidly it can occur much more rapidly in their populations... ....Read More

 

The Importance of Early Season Disease Control in Barley

Grain yield in cereals is determined by three factors:
1. Number of ears per m2
2. Grains per ear
3. Average grain weight
Number of ears per m2 X Grains per ear X Average grain weight = Yield.....Read More

 

 

 

Prevent lost Profit with Cereal Fungicides

The costs of growing cereals is increasing; with variable costs of €1,371 per hectare (€555 per acre) and €982 per hectare (€397 per acre) for winter wheat and spring barley respectively; according to the Teagasc 2013 costs & returns booklet.....Read More

 

 

 

Cereal Fertiliser Requirements and Compound Choice

The traditional approach of three 50Kg bags per acre of 18-6-12 as the intial fertiliser application for cereal crops is a poor choice in the majority of situations for today’s cereal growers.  The Potassium (K) level supplied by three bags of 18-6-12, is only 50% or less of requirements of most cereal crops.  Potassium is vital for yield, grain quality and straw strength.. ....Read More

 

 

 

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