Nutrition

Mineral feeding for the pre-calving cows 

Dry cows should receive a pre-calving minerals from 6 - 8 weeks before calving.  
The main aim of this feeding is to 
- Prevent milk fever, and retained cleansings, 
- Produce a healthy calf,
- Ensure the cow calves down in the correct mineral status.

Dry cows should receive a pre-calving minerals from 6 - 8 weeks before calving.  The main aim of this feeding is to - Prevent milk fever, and retained cleansings, - Produce a healthy calf,- Ensure the cow calves down in the correct mineral status:....Read More

 

 

Feeding for Fertility 

Dry cows should receive a pre-calving minerals from 6 - 8 weeks before calving.  
The main aim of this feeding is to 
- Prevent milk fever, and retained cleansings, 
- Produce a healthy calf,
- Ensure the cow calves down in the correct mineral status.

Poor fertility performance is the biggest cause of involuntary culling on Irish dairy farms.  Reducing empty rates from 15% to 10% will yield a return of 1c/ltr net margin.  For good fertility performance you need;

-  An optimum breeding management programme, 

- A feeding programme appropriate for your cow,  

- A good herd health status 

- An AI programme that breeds for fertility:....Read More

 

Feeding for Breeding 2015 

A New Era

Quotas are no more! While a large superlevy for 2014-2015 will hit many of you, hopefully you can take comfort in the knowledge that there will be no superlevy in 2015-2016 or any year after that.. :....Read More

 

Feeding Spring Calving Cows in Early Lactation 2015

Supplementation in early lactation
1. Under Quota Herds• Maximise milk yield (economically)-Feed a 20% protein ration when indoors fulltime (24% if maize silage fed), reducing the protein level as grass enters the diet.....Read More

 

Dairygold 2014-2015 Dry Cow Nutrition Programme

The most stressful time for your cows is around calving with over 50% of dairy cow metabolic problems occurring within three weeks of calving. Proper dry cow management and preparation for this period of stress is critical...... Read More 

  

Milk Fever

What is Milk Fever?

Milk fever is a disease, characterized by reduced blood Calcium (Ca) levels. It is most common in the first few days of lactation when demand for Ca for milk production exceeds the body’s ability to mobilize calcium reserves.

Why is Milk Fever important?
Milk fever, both clinical and subclinical, is the most important macro mineral disorder that affects transition dairy cows. Milk fever affects muscle and immune function and which can cause a cascade of problems ultimately leading to:....Read More 

 

Late Lactation Feeding in 2014

Risk of FAT Cows Calving Down in 2015
This year, if you are over quota, you may decide to dry cows off early. If you decide to do this, target thin cows and first calvers as they will benefit from an extended dry period. Be cautious about drying all cows in your herd early. There is a danger of some cows becoming too fat which can lead to difficult calvings, milk fever and other metabolic problems....Read More 

 

Feeding Spring Calving Cows in Late Lactation

Autumn grass has a lower energy value (lower sugar content) compared to spring/summer grass even through it can look very leafy and green.  Consequently the response to ration in terms of milk yield is better in the autumn than at any other time of the year; typically 1 litre of milk per 1Kg concentrate fed....Read More 

 

Feeding Concentrates at Grass

Nutrition for breeding
Your nutritional aims for successful breeding are
:• To minimise your herd’s body condition loss between calving and the start of breeding i.e. maximum 0.5 condition score loss and/or a minimum BCS of 2.5 at breeding....Read More 

 

Cull Cows-Sell Now or Feed and Fatten?

With the spectre of a super levy looming on the horizon, many farmers will take the opportunity to cull infertile cows from the herd.  However should farmers offload these animals as soon as possible or should they feed and fatten them before selling?:....Read More

Autumn grass limitations: Autumn grass has a lower energy value (lower sugar content) compared to spring/summer grass even through it can look very leafy and green.. :....Read More

 

Milk Protein Drops-Causes and Solutions
Milk protein varies with genetic potential, breed and stage of lactation.  Milk protein starts high after calving, reduces in early lactation (dilution effect of increased yield) and increases thereafter.  Cow nutrition influences protein as follows:....Read More

 

 

Autumn grass limitations
Autumn grass has a lower energy value (lower sugar content) compared to spring/summer grass even through it can look very leafy and green. Consequently the response to ration in terms of milk yield is better in the autumn than at any other time of the year. ....Read More

 

 

 
Body Conditioning Scoring (BCS) Guide

 

BCS is a simple technique to assess how thin or fat a cow is on a scale of 1 to 5 with increments of 0.25, where 1 is extremely thin and 5 is extremely fat. What are the key BCS targets?....Read More

 

 

 

 

Your nutritional aims for successful breeding are
:• To minimise your herd’s body condition loss between calving and the start of breeding i.e. maximum 0.5 condition score loss and/or a minimum BCS of 2.5 at breeding.

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